50 Excellent Adobe After Effects Tutorials | The JotForm Blog

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Large bodies of water, like an ocean, include swells or wide, stable waves with no apparent slowdown. With just one click, you can interact with experts and get solutions at a glance when you need them. A few tricks and techniques in After Effects will have you up and running in no time at all. For example, if you are using a layer of a bird flapping its wings and you choose Relative for Time Offset Type with a Time Offset of 0, the flapping wings for all the instances of the bird are synchronized.

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If you're using CC Particle World (included with Ae), then set its Particle > Particle Type to “Textured QuadPolgyon.” Then, in Particle > Texture. Common Lighting controls and Material controls; Card Dance effect; Caustics effect; Foam effect; Particle Playground effect; Shatter effect. After Effects Tutorial CC Particle World Background After Effect Tutorial, After Dans ce tuto Adobe After Effects CC , je vous présente une technique pour Tutorial That Grainy Texture Look After Effect Tutorial, Text Animation, After. Updates for This Patch: Relinking issue on Mac fixed; Intel/Nvidia graphics switch issue fixed; AE CC Compatibility. Other Recent Updates. Feb 28, - In this After Effects Tutorial, create a 2D shape particle explosion with shape layers! Here's my After Effects - December 21, December 21, You can set the Texture time to Birth so every particle will be different.

After effect 2020 particle texture. Fix — Single model — studio cam.

community. After Effects help and inspiration the Reddit way. I don't see an option to assign my particle layer as the texture. Help would AE interface is laggy but runs smooth on the same system. Any ideas. After Effects CS3 includes built-in particle filters you can use in your These examples have custom Layer textures; we'll look at working with. Red Giant Complete. Trapcode. Go Back Trapcode: Particular · Form · Mir · 3D Stroke · Shine · Starglow · Sound Keys · Tao · Lux · Echospace · Horizon. Stardust is a Modular 3D particle system for After Effects. It has an easy to use Material: Stencil – Added option to set a material as Stencil. Physics: Properties. This post presents a round-up of Adobe After Effects Tutorials for your visual effect in AE and Use displacement, turbulence and particle world. All textures and fonts are available in the project download as well as the This article is originally published on Jan 07, , and updated on Nov 23,

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Learn advanced texture creation and particle behaviors by creating your own custom AAA quality particle effects. Advanced Particle VFX in Unity and After Effects. Learn advanced texture total hoursUpdated 11/ Rating: out. Stardust is a modular 3D particle system for After Effects. Stardust for After Effects Summer Trailer; Stardust for After Effects - New.After effect 2020 particle texture > Effects > Particle System). Because the component is quite complicated, the Inspector is divided into a number of collapsible sub-sections or modules that each. Best After Effects Background Free Video Clip Downloads from the Videezy community. Free After Effects Background Stock Video Footage licensed​. Try these five simple Adobe After Effects techniques to create CC Particle World will allow you to have a constant flow of customized moving particles. you can use a texture to composite over your pre-made background. Types of particles 3 Particle textures 4 Particle IDs 5 History 6 3D Printing using Mudbox Jul 03, · Instead of holding your fire, expose it to the download. upklyak Use this premium quality After Effects fire particles presets. The best After Effects plugins for speeding up your motion workflow and planets is an easy task in 3D – create a sphere, apply textures, done!

After effect 2020 particle texture.

Card Dance effect No other plug-in suite offers more visual effects and transitions for broadcast, Support for Adobe After Effects multi-frame rendering (currently in Adobe public beta) Add lightning, clouds, textures, and even a starfield generator accurately Optics · App Manager · Particle Illusion · Title Studio · Nitro FX · More Products​. Dragon Crashers is an official sample project made in Unity Assign the texture to the particle Years ago before dynamic lights were affordable Advanced Particle VFX in Unity and After Effects Tutorial Content Details can be found.

Particular uses After Effects' 3D Camera and Lights so you can fully integrate as a particle by assigning it to a 2D sprite or textured polygon. Energy Particle Blast Logo Reveal is an awe-inspiring after effects The particle trail is a On the left it says what opacity the black texture used in the accumulation buffer was. The explanation of this 26 июля ·. This transformation.   After effect 2020 particle texture The OpenGL rendering allows users to quickly create 3D text and complex particles with dynamic shadows, reflections, and textures, all inside. We can add support for rewinding particle effects that play in real time Texture Sheet Animation on a particle system that scales over time to create an explosion​. Oct 07, · If you have any experience with Unity, you've likely used its and After Effects – Learn advanced texture creation and particle behaviors by. Ruth medina ビデオ Not only you can render the particles, but also create all sorts of interesting Plexus 3 was designed from the ground up to take advantage of AE's new OBJ Object now also imports normals and texture co-ordinates along with CC , CC , CC , CC on both Windows (Windows 7 or. You can software render particles as thin gas, cloud, thick cloud, connected to its Surface port, and a particle cloud material connected to its This glow effect is added as a post-process, after the rendering is completed.

After effect 2020 particle texture

  After effect 2020 particle texture

Using simulation effects in After Effects

  After effect 2020 particle texture  

After effect 2020 particle texture. Superluminal | Stardust

  After effect 2020 particle texture  Cincin bear patreon

After effect 2020 particle texture

The Built-in Particle System uses a component, so placing a Particle System in a Scene is a matter of adding a pre-made GameObject menu: GameObject The fundamental object in Unity scenes, which can represent characters, props, scenery, cameras, waypoints, and more.

A GameObject can contain any number of components. Unity has many built-in components, and you can create your own by writing scripts that inherit from MonoBehaviour. Because the component is quite complicated, the Inspector is divided into a number of collapsible sub-sections or modules that each contain a group of related properties.

Additionally, you can edit one or more systems at the same time using a separate Editor window accessed via the Open Window button in the Inspector. See documentation on the Particle System component and individual Particle System modules to learn more. Think of each unique Scene file as a unique level. In each Scene, you place your environments, obstacles, and decorations, essentially designing and building your game in pieces.

The Playback Speed allows you to speed up or slow down the particle simulation, so you can quickly see how it looks at an advanced state. The Playback Time indicates the time elapsed since the system was started; this may be faster or slower than real time depending on the playback speed. The Particle Count indicates how many particles are currently in the system. To generate just one particle at as a 'Burst' event, set 'Rate over Time' to 0.

Find "MyContainer". As for the emission — go to the Emission Property of the particle system and create a single burst Time: 0, Min: 1, Max: 1. Set the Start Lifetime to something very big so that the burst never dies.

The idea of the post was to give a guide on how to create a similar particle In this final lesson we'll create a firefly particle system. This is a quick and easy way to create what looks like fireflies flying around. We'll use a texture I created in photoshop, a particle shader, and a custom created curve to control the size of the particles to mimic the glowing of the fireflies flickering.

Added beta option to inspector to save a Texture3D to the project for the current frame, can be used by GPU shader or particle systems such a TC Particles. Consilience: The Unity of Knowledge is an eloquent explication of the ideas and dispositions I hold in highest regard. It is arguably the most enterprising work of an ambitious career, which makes it both stunning as well as outlandish.

Starting the scene; Adding a particle system. Adjust the particle system parameters; Setting up a new material for the particle system; Creating the particle shader.

Adding a color to the particle shader; Adding the steam particle effect. Adjusting the steam particle's parameters. Particle effects are a great way to add polish to interactive experiences.

Cash inc underground lab. Eickhorn m3 knife. Best label printer for mac. Unity features a robust Particle System where you can simulate moving liquids, smoke, clouds, flames, magic spells, and a whole slew of other effects. In this tutorial, you'll get a high level overview of the Particle System and its features, so that you can start getting ideas for your own projects.

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To use the conversion script, simply download it and place it in your project folder inside of a folder called Editor. This is due to misleading documentation - Play also sets the particle system's time to 0, similar to Stop. If you run Play on every frame, it will rewind every frame and you will never see progress.

I recommend filing a bug report to Unity even though documentation bugs take lower priority than functionality bugs. See Also: Stop, Pause, isEmitting functions. The following example creates a GUI window for Get up to speed with the techniques and pipelines for creating complex, high quality, AAA ready particle effects for your games! A Particle System may stop emitting when its emission module has finished, it has been paused or if the system has been stopped using Stop with the StopEmitting flag.

In Unity Version Newton brings realistic physics to After Effects, making your 2D composition layers act like solid objects that interact with each other — just like in the real world. It gives you many ways to control the properties of your objects, including type, density, friction, bounciness and velocity. Once you complete your simulation, the animation is recreated in After Effects with standard keyframes, so you can adjust the timing however you choose.

For those looking to produce a quick animated video without much experience, Animation Composer is perfect for that… but more importantly.. For those in the industry that do this professionally in any sort of a high capacity — this does an amazing service. You can try different animations in seconds because everything is super easy to add, remove and edit. The sounds can be loaded into Animation Composer to be easily previewed, searched and added to the playhead.

Optical Flares is an After Effects Plugin developed for generating and animating organic looking lens flares with unbelievable ease and speed. It has an intuitive, elegant interface that makes designing a beautiful, realistic, and complex lens flares a joy. OpenGL acceleration allows artists to quickly and easily generate flares and add finishing touches to motion graphics and live action footage.

Optical Flares is an affordable way to add sophistication and magic to your motion graphics and visual effects! Colorista 4 puts streamlined professional color correction tools, directly on your editing timeline.

Transform After Effects into a professional color grading environment with the new Colorista panel. Colorista is always available to adjust a clip on your timeline without the need to manually apply an effect to every clip. Colorista 4 now directly supports Log footage, with both specially-tuned log adjustments and built-in Look Up Tables for common Log formats. By choosing the right After Effects plugins for your work, you can save time and improve your workflow.

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With a suitable texture map, you can use this technique to create the effect of liquid mercury. Displays the caustics, the concentrations of light on the bottom surface, caused by the lensing effect of the water waves. This control changes the way everything looks: The dark spots of the waves get much darker, and the light spots get much lighter. Specifies the layer above the water.

Scaling makes the sky layer larger or smaller. If the edges of the sky layer show, scale the layer up. Specifies how a scaled-down sky layer is tiled. Tiles uses the traditional tiling method of abutting the right edge of one layer tile to the left edge of another layer tile. This option works well if the layer contains a repeating pattern, like a logo, that needs to read a certain way.

Reflected abuts each edge of a layer tile to a mirrored copy of the tile. Specifies how to handle the layer when it is smaller than the composition. Intensity specifies the opacity of the sky layer. Convergence specifies how close the sky and the bottom or water layer appear, controlling the extent to which the waves distort the sky. This effect generates bubbles that flow, cling, and pop.

Use the controls for the effect to adjust attributes for the bubbles such as stickiness, viscosity, life span, and bubble strength. You can control exactly how the foam particles interact with each other and with their environment, and specify a separate layer to act as a map, controlling precisely where the foam flows.

For example, you can have particles flow around a logo or fill a logo with bubbles. You can also substitute any image or movie for bubbles. For example, you can create swarms of ants, flocks of birds, or crowds of people. Note: On a frame-by-frame basis, Foam renders quickly, but the slightest adjustment in the initial settings is likely to result in very different output a few seconds into the simulation.

When making adjustments to Physics controls, the farther into the simulation you are, the longer the adjustments take to render, because each adjustment results in the simulation being recalculated all the way back to the beginning. Not every frame takes this long to calculate; once Foam adjusts to the change, rendering speeds up again. Displays the bubbles without fully rendering them. Using Draft mode is a fast way to preview the behavior of the bubbles.

Draft mode is the only way to preview the universe edges, the Flow Map alignment, and the Producer location, orientation, and size. Blue ellipses represent bubbles. A red ellipse represents the Producer Point.

A red rectangle represents the bubble universe. Displays the Draft view wireframe superimposed over a grayscale representation of the flow map, if selected. The Producer controls specify the location where the bubbles originate, as well as the speed at which they are generated:. Adjusts the rotation orientation of the area from which the bubbles can be produced. Specifies whether the producer point and all of its associated keyframes remain relative to the universe selected or to the screen unselected when you zoom in or out on it.

If you select Zoom Producer Point, the point moves with the universe as it is zoomed out, and the point ends up closer to the center of the screen.

Determines the rate at which bubbles are generated. This control does not affect the number of bubbles per frame. Rather, the rate is the average number of bubbles generated every 30th of a second. Higher numbers yield more bubbles. Note: If a large number of bubbles appear in the same point at the same time, some may pop. Specifies the average size for adult bubbles. Specifies the range of possible bubble sizes.

This control uses the Size value as the average and creates smaller-than-average and larger-than average bubbles by using the range you specify here. For example, a default bubble Size of 0. Specifies the maximum life of a bubble. This value is not absolute; if it were, the bubbles would all pop after the same lifespan, as if they were hitting a wall.

Rather, this value is a target lifespan; some bubbles pop early, and others may last until the end. Specifies how fast a bubble reaches full size. When a bubble is released from the producer point, it generally starts out rather small. If you set this value too high and you specify a small producer area, the bubbles pop each other, and the effect generates fewer bubbles than expected.

Influences how likely a bubble is to pop before it reaches its Lifespan limit. Lowering the Strength for a bubble makes it more likely to pop early in its life, when forces like wind and flow maps act upon it. Lower values are good for soap bubbles. The highest value is recommended for flocking animations. Note: Set this value low, and set Pop Velocity high to create chain reactions of popping bubbles. Sets the speed of the bubble as it is emitted by the producer point.

The other Physics parameters affect this speed. Sets the initial direction in which the bubble moves as it emerges from the producer point. Other bubbles and other Physics controls also affect the direction. Sets the speed of the wind that pushes the bubbles in the direction specified by Wind Direction. Sets the direction in which the bubbles blow. Animate this control to create turbulent wind effects. Wind affects bubbles if Wind Speed is greater than 0. Randomly changes the shape of bubbles from perfectly round to a more natural elliptical shape.

Controls whether bubbles bounce off each other, stick to each other, or pass through each other. The higher the Repulsion value, the more likely bubbles are to interact with each other when they collide. Controls how popping bubbles affect each other. When a bubble pops, it affects other bubbles around it by leaving a hole that other bubbles can fill, pushing other bubbles away, or popping other bubbles.

The higher the value, the more popping bubbles affect one another. Specifies the rate at which bubbles decelerate after being released from the producer point, and controls the speed of the flow of the bubbles. A high Viscosity value creates resistance as the bubbles get farther away from the producer point, causing them to slow down. If Viscosity is set high enough, the bubbles stop.

The thicker the substance, the higher the Viscosity. For example, if you want to create the effect of bubbles traveling through oil, set Viscosity fairly high, so that the bubbles meet resistance as they travel. To create the effect of bubbles floating in air, set Viscosity fairly low. Causes bubbles to clump together and makes them less vulnerable to other Physics controls like Wind Direction.

The higher the Stickiness, the more likely the bubbles are to form clusters and cling. Use Stickiness and Viscosity to create a bubble cluster. Zooms in or out around the center of the bubble universe. To create large bubbles, increase the Zoom value instead of the Size value because large bubble sizes can be unstable. Sets the boundaries of the bubble universe. When bubbles completely leave the universe, they pop and are gone forever. By default, the universe is the size of the layer.

Values greater than 1 create a universe that stretches beyond the borders of the layer. Use higher values to make bubbles flow in from outside the frame, or make it possible to zoom out and bring them back into the picture. Using a value lower than 1 clips the bubbles before they reach the edge of the layer. For example, when you want to confine bubbles to a specific area, such as inside a mask shape, set Universe Size a little larger than the mask size to remove all the extra bubbles and speed up the rendering process.

The Rendering controls specify the appearance of the bubbles, including their texture and reflection:. Specifies the relative transparency of bubbles as they intersect. Transparent blends the bubbles smoothly together, allowing you to see the bubbles through each other. Solid Old On Top makes a younger bubble appear to be underneath an older bubble and eliminates transparency.

Use this setting to simulate bubbles flowing toward you. Solid New On Top makes younger bubbles appear to be on top of older bubbles and also eliminates transparency. Use this setting to make bubbles appear as if they are flowing downhill. Specifies the bubble texture.

Use a preset texture, or create your own. To see the texture, make sure that View is set to Rendered. To create your own texture, select User Defined, and from the Bubble Texture Layer menu, choose the layer you want to use as the bubble.

Note: The preset bubble textures are prerendered 64x64 images. If you zoom in above 64x64, the bubble appears blurry. To avoid this blurriness, use a higher-resolution custom bubble. Specifies the layer you want to use as the bubble image. To use this control, choose User Defined from the Bubble Texture menu.

If you want the layer to appear only as a bubble, turn off the video switch for the layer in the Timeline panel. Note: You can use any file type that After Effects supports. If you plan on zooming in or using a large bubble size, make sure that the resolution of the layer is high enough to avoid blurring.

You can make blood cells, starfish, insects, space aliens, or flying monkeys. Determines the direction that the bubble rotates. Fixed releases the bubble from the producer right side up and keeps it that way. Use this control if the bubble has built-in highlights and shading, as all of the preset bubbles do. Physical Orientation buffets and spins bubbles around by the forces on them, creating a chaotic scene. Bubble Velocity faces the bubble in the direction of its motion.

This setting is the most useful for flocking-style animations. Specifies the layer that is reflected in the bubbles.

If you want to use this layer only for the reflection, turn off the video switch for a layer. Controls how much of the selected Environment Map is reflected in the bubbles. The higher the value, the more the reflection obscures the original bubble texture. Controls how much your Environment Map is distorted as it is mapped onto the bubbles.

A value of 0 projects the map flat on top of all of the bubbles in the scene. As the value increases, the reflection distorts to account for the spherical shape of each bubble. Specifies the layer used to control the direction and speed of the bubbles. Use a still image layer; if you select a movie as the flow map layer, only the first frame is used. A flow map is a height map based on luminance: White is high, and black is low.

White is not infinitely high; if a bubble travels fast enough, it can travel past a white obstacle. Make sure that the map is a little blurry; sharp edges can create unpredictable results. For example, to make bubbles flow through a canyon, create a flow map with a white canyon rim, a black canyon, and blurry gray walls. Use wind to blow the bubbles in the direction you want them to flow, and the walls of the canyon contain them.

You can also use a gentle gradient on the floor of the canyon to control the flow direction. Also, try blurring the flow map a little to make sure that it does not have excessively abrupt edges.

Controls the difference between white and black as they are used to determine steepness. If the bubbles are ricocheting randomly off the flow map, decrease this value. Specifies whether the flow map is relative to the layer or to the universe. The flow map resizes itself to fit whichever you specify. This control is useful when you want to enlarge the universe but the flow map is designed for a particular layer, or when you want the bubbles to start outside the frame and be affected by the flow map as they arrive in the frame.

Increases the precision, and therefore the realism, of the simulation. However, the higher the value, the longer the composition takes to render. Normal generally produces good results and takes the least amount of time to render. High returns better results but takes longer to render. Intense increases the rendering time but produces more predictable bubble behavior. It often solves problems of erratic behavior that can occur with small bubbles, high bubble speeds, and steep slopes.

The Particle Playground effect lets you animate a large number of similar objects independently, such as a swarm of bees or a snow storm. Use the Cannon to create a stream of particles from a specific point on the layer, or use the Grid to generate a plane of particles.

The Layer Exploder and Particle Exploder can create new particles from existing layers or particles. You can use any combination of particle generators on the same layer. David Van Brink provides a video walkthrough and downloadable example project on the omino website that show several things that you can do with the Particle Playground effect, including how to use the Kinetic Friction ephemeral property mapper.

Brian Peterson provides a tutorial on the Videomaker website that shows how to use the Particle Playground effect to create a flock of birds. Start by creating a stream or plane of particles, or by exploding an existing layer into particles. Once you have a layer of particles, you can control their properties, such as speed, size, and color.

You can replace the default dot particles with images from an existing layer to create, for example, an entire snowstorm from a single snowflake layer. You can also use text characters as particles. For example, you can shoot words across the screen, or you can create a sea of text in which a few letters change color, revealing a message. Use Layer Map controls to specify a layer in place of each default dot particle.

Use Gravity, Repel, and Wall controls to influence overall particle behavior. Use Property Mapper controls to influence particle properties. Use Options to set options, including options for substituting text characters in place of dots. Note: Because of the complexity of Particle Playground, you may experience long computation, preview, and render times. The Particle Playground effect renders with anti-aliasing when the layer to which it is applied is set to Best quality.

It also applies motion blur to moving particles when both the Motion Blur layer switch and the Enable Motion Blur composition switch are on. Instead, it uses the layer in its original state. To keep changes for a layer when you use it as a particle source, precompose the layer and use the precomposition layer as the control layer.

See Compound effects and control layers. Particle Playground can generate three kinds of particles: dots, a layer, or text characters. You can specify only one kind of particle per particle generator. The Grid creates particles in an organized grid format with straight rows and columns. The exploders create particles randomly, like firecracker sparks. The particle generators set the attributes of particles at the moment they are created. For example, if you want particles to stick to grid intersections, you might use the Static Friction option in the Persistent Property Mapper to hold particles in place.

Otherwise, as soon as particles are created, they begin moving away from their original grid positions. The Cannon is on by default; to use a different method to create particles, first turn off the Cannon by setting Particles Per Second to zero.

The Cannon creates particles in a continuous stream. Sets the size of the barrel radius for the Cannon. Negative values create a circular barrel, and positive values create a square barrel. For a narrow source, such as a ray gun, specify a low value. For a wide source, such as a school of fish, specify a high value. Specifies how often particles are created.

A value of 0 creates no particles. A high value increases the density of the particle stream. For a highly focused stream, such as a ray gun, specify a low value. For a stream that widens quickly, specify a high value. Specifies the initial speed of particles in pixels per second as they emanate from the Cannon.

Specifies the amount of random velocity of particles. A higher value results in more variation in the velocity of particles. For example, if you set Velocity to 20 and Velocity Random Spread to 10, particles leave the Cannon at velocities ranging from 15 to 25 pixels per second.

Sets the color of dots or text characters. This control has no effect if you use a layer as the particle source. Sets the radius of dots, in pixels, or the size of text characters in points. The Grid creates a continuous plane of particles from a set of grid intersections. By default, the Force control of Gravity is on, so Grid particles fall toward the bottom of the frame. With the Grid, a new particle appears on every frame at each grid intersection.

To make more particles appear in each frame, increase the values for Particles Across and Particles Down. Note: By default, the Cannon is on and the Grid is off. If you are using the Grid and want to stop the Cannon from generating particles, turn off the Cannon by setting its Particles Per Second value to 0. Specifies the x,y coordinates of the grid center.

When a grid particle is created, it is centered over its grid intersection, regardless of whether it is a dot, a layer, or a text character. If you want text characters to appear at the grid position with normal spacing, use a text alignment other than the Use Grid option. Particles Across, Particles Down. Specify the number of particles to distribute horizontally and vertically across the grid area.

Particles are generated only when the value is 1 or more. Sets the radius of dots in pixels or the size of text characters in points. The Layer Exploder explodes a layer into new particles, and the Particle Exploder explodes a particle into more new particles. In addition to explosion effects, the exploders are also handy for simulating fireworks or for rapidly increasing the number of particles.

A layer is exploded once for each frame. By default, this creates a continuous shower of particles for the duration of the composition. If the source of the layer is a nested composition, you can set different Opacity values or In and Out points for the layers within the nested composition to make the exploding layer transparent at different points in time. The Layer Exploder does not create particles where the source of the layer is transparent.

To change the position of the exploding layer, precompose the layer with its new position use the Move All Attributes Into The New Composition option , and then use the precomposed layer as the exploding layer. When you explode particles, the new particles inherit the position, velocity, opacity, scale, and rotation of the original particles. After layers or particles explode, Gravity, Repel, Wall, and Property Mapper controls influence the movement of particles.

For example, change Opacity to make the resulting particles fade out, or change the Red, Green, and Blue color channels to make resulting particles change color as they appear to cool.

Layer Exploder only Specifies the layer you want to explode. To make the video disappear the moment the particles appear, either turn off the video for the layer or trim the Out point of the layer.

Specifies the radius of the particles resulting from the explosion. This value must be smaller than the radius of the original layer or particle. Specifies, in pixels per second, the maximum speed of the range within which Particle Playground varies the velocity of the resulting particles. High values create a more dispersed or cloudlike explosion. Low values keep the new particles closer together and can make the exploded particles resemble a halo or shockwave. To replace the dots with a layer in the composition, use the Layer Map.

For example, if you use a movie of a single bird flapping its wings as a particle source layer, After Effects replaces all dots with an instance of the bird movie, creating a flock of birds.

A particle source layer can be a still image, a solid, or a nested After Effects composition. A multiframe layer is any layer with a source that varies over time, such as a movie or a composition. When you map new particles to a multiframe layer, use the Time Offset Type control to specify how you want to use the frames of the layer. For example, use Absolute to map an unchanging image onto a particle, or use Relative to map an animating sequence of frames onto a particle.

You can randomize both Absolute and Relative across particles. Note: When you choose a layer for Layer Map, Particle Playground ignores any changes that you made to that layer within that composition. To keep transformations, effects, masks, rasterization options, expressions, or keyframe changes for a layer when you use it as a particle source, precompose the layer.

Specifies how you want to use the frames of a multiframe layer. For example, if you are using a layer of a bird flapping its wings and you choose Relative for Time Offset Type with a Time Offset of 0, the flapping wings for all the instances of the bird are synchronized. While this may be realistic for a marching band, it is not realistic for a flock of birds.

To make each bird start flapping its wings from a different frame in the layer, use Relative Random. Relative Starts playing the layer at a frame based on the Time Offset you specify, relative to the current time of the effect layer; then advances in step with the current time of the Particle Playground layer.

If you specify a Time Offset of 0, all particles show the frame that corresponds to the current time of the effect layer. If you choose a Time Offset of 0. Regardless of the Time Offset you specify, the first particle always displays the frame of the source layer that corresponds to the current time of the effect layer.

Absolute Displays a frame from the layer based on the Time Offset you specify, regardless of the current time. Choose Absolute when you want a particle to show the same frame of a multiframe source layer for its entire lifespan, instead of cycling through different frames as the effect layer advances in time. For example, if you choose Absolute and specify a Time Offset of 0, every particle shows the first frame of the source layer for its entire lifespan.

If you want to show a frame other than the first frame, move the layer earlier in time until the frame you want to show corresponds to the In point of the Particle Playground layer. If you specify a Time Offset of 0. Relative Random Starts playing the layer from a frame chosen at random, within the range between the current time of the effect layer and the Random Time Max you specify.

For example, if you choose Relative Random and specify a Random Time Max of 1, each particle starts playing from a layer frame chosen at random from between the current time and 1 second after the current time. If, for another example, you specify a negative Random Time Max value of - 1, the Random Time Max is before the current time, so that the range within which new particles start playing advances as the current time advances.

However, the range is always between the current time and one second earlier than the current time. Absolute Random Takes a frame at random from the layer, by using a time in the range from 0 to the Random Time Max you specify. Choose Absolute Random when you want each particle to represent a different single frame of a multiframe layer.

For example, if you choose Absolute Random and specify a Random Time Max of 1, each particle shows a layer frame from a random time between 0 seconds and 1 second into the duration of the layer.

Specifies the frame from which to start playing sequential frames from the layer. You can use text characters as particles.

For example, you can type a message that the Cannon shoots across the frame. You can also change the attributes of any three sets of characters. For example, you can make some of the characters larger or brighter than others. For Order, click to specify the sequence in which characters exit the Cannon. The sequence is relative to the character order typed in the box. Therefore, select Right to Left. For Loop Text, select to continuously generate the characters you typed.

Deselect to generate only one instance of the characters. If you want to stop replacing default particles with text, delete all text from the box in the Edit Cannon Text dialog box. For Alignment, click Left, Center, or Right to position text in the box at the Position specified in the Grid control, or click Use Grid to position each letter in the text on consecutive grid intersections. For Loop Text, select to repeat the characters you typed until all the grid intersections contain one character.

Grid intersections are specified by the Particle Across and Particle Down controls. Deselect to generate only one instance of the text. This option is available only if you select Use Grid alignment.

If you want to stop replacing default particles with text, delete all text from the box in the Edit Grid Text dialog box. You can differently affect only certain subsets of text particles by specifying Selection Text values.

To open the Particle Playground options dialog box, click Options at the top of the Particle Playground entry in the Effect Controls panel. This is the same place where you can specify the text used by the Grid or Cannon emitters. Then enter text in one or more of the Selection Text fields, and click OK.

After doing this, you can then choose one of the Selection Text sets from the Character menu under one of the Affects property groups. Note: The string matching is case-sensitive, and it does include punctuation marks and other symbols. Note: As with all text features, consider using this feature with symbol fonts, like wingdings. To have full control over particle movement and appearance, you must balance these controls. For example, if you want to use the Cannon to shoot sparks that fade over time, it may seem that you need only animate the Color control of the Cannon.

To control the color for the lifespan of particles, create a layer map and use one of the Property Mappers to alter the color channels of the particles. At particle creation, particle velocity is set by the Cannon and the exploders; Grid particles have no initial speed. After particle creation, use the Force control in the Gravity and Repel control groups. You can also influence the speed of individual particles by using a layer map to set values for the Speed, Kinetic Friction, Force, and Mass properties in the Property Mappers.

At particle creation, the Cannon includes particle direction; the Layer Exploder and Particle Exploder send new particles in all directions; and Grid particles have no initial direction. After particle creation, direction can be influenced by the Direction control in the Gravity control group or by specifying a Boundary mask in the Wall control group. You can also influence the direction of individual particles by using a layer map to set values for the Gradient Force, X Speed, and Y Speed properties in the Property Mappers.

Use a Wall mask to contain particles to a different area or to remove all barriers. You can also restrict particles to an area by using a layer map to set values for the Gradient Force property in the Property Mappers.

At particle creation, the Cannon, Grid, Layer Exploder, and Particle Exploder set particle size unless you replace the default dots with a layer map. The Cannon and Grid set the initial color, while the Layer Exploder and Particle Exploder take color from the exploded dot, layer, or character. The Options dialog box affects the initial appearance of text.

At particle creation, the Cannon and Grid set no rotation; the Particle Exploder takes rotation from the exploded dot, layer, or character. Use Auto-Orient Rotation to make particles rotate automatically along their respective trajectories. For example, a particle can point up as it climbs an arc, and point down as it descends. It is easier to observe only when you replace the dot particle with text characters or a layer. After particle creation, use a layer map to set values for the Angle, Angular Velocity, and Torque property in the Property Mappers.

Use Gravity controls to pull existing particles in a direction you specify. Particles accelerate in the direction of gravity. Apply in a vertical direction to create falling particles, such as rain or snow, or rising particles, such as champagne bubbles. Apply in a horizontal direction to simulate wind. Specifies the force of gravity. Positive values increase the force, pulling particles more strongly. Negative values reduce the force. Specifies a range of randomness for the Force. At zero, all particles fall at the same rate.

At a higher value, particles fall at slightly different rates. Although pure gravity accelerates all objects equally, increasing the Force Random Spread value can produce more realistic results with subjects such as leaves falling through air, where enough air resistance exists to vary the rates of descent of the leaves. Specifies the angle along which gravity pulls. Repel controls specify how nearby particles repel or attract each other.

This feature simulates adding a positive or negative magnetic charge to each particle. You can specify which particles, layers, or characters are the repelling force and which are repelled. Note: If you want to repel an entire layer of particles away from a specific area, use the Property Mapper controls, Wall or Gradient Force.

Specifies the repel force. Greater values repel particles with more force. Negative values result in particle attraction. Specifies the radius measured in pixels within which particles are repelled. Another particle must be within this radius to be repelled. Specifies which particles act as the repellers or attractors to another subset you specify by using the Affects control. Wall controls contain particles, limiting the area within which particles can move.

A wall is a closed mask that you create by using a mask tool, such as the Pen tool. When a particle hits the wall, it bounces off at a velocity based on the force with which it hit. Specifies the mask to use as the wall.

You can create a new mask by drawing one on the effect layer. Many Particle Playground controls include Affects controls. Affects controls specify which particles the encompassing control affects. For example, the Affects controls within the Particle Exploder controls specify which particles the Particle Exploder affects.

Specifies the particle generator or combination of particle generators whose particles you want to affect. Note: The simulation space is not bounded by the dimensions of the layer to which Particle Playground is applied. You may need to use a selection map that is larger than the Particle Playground layer so that the selection map affects dots that are not visible. Specifies the characters you want to affect.

This control applies only if you are using text characters as the particle type. Specifies the age threshold, in seconds, above or below which you want to affect a particle.

Positive values affect older particles, and negative values affect younger particles. For example, a value of 10 means that as soon as a particle reaches 10 seconds, it changes to the new value. Feathering creates a gradual, rather than abrupt, change. You can control specific properties of individual particles by using a layer map and either the Persistent Property Mapper or the Ephemeral Property Mapper.

Particle Playground interprets the brightness of each layer map pixel as a specific value. The Property Mapper associates a specific layer map channel Red, Green, or Blue with a specific property, so that as a particle passes over a certain pixel, the brightness value at that pixel modifies the property. A persistent change to a particle property retains the most recent value set by a layer map for the remaining lifespan of the particle, unless the particle is modified by another control such as Repel, Gravity, or Wall.

For example, if you use a layer map to modify particle size and you animate the layer map so it exits the frame, the particles keep the last size value set by the layer map after it exits the frame. An ephemeral change to a particle property causes the property to revert to its original value after each frame. For example, if you use a layer map to modify particle size and you animate the layer map so that it exits the frame, each particle returns to its original size value as soon as no layer map pixels correspond to it.

Similarly, if you apply an operator such as Add, each time a particle passes over a different layer map pixel, the value of the layer map pixel is added to the original value of the particle. It gives you many ways to control the properties of your objects, including type, density, friction, bounciness and velocity. Once you complete your simulation, the animation is recreated in After Effects with standard keyframes, so you can adjust the timing however you choose.

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