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Amendment of section 9 of Principal Act. Other amendments of Explosives Act Assessment of damages Football banning orders Relevant Offences and Legislation Offences under the Fraud Act are applicable to a wide range of cyber-frauds by focussing on the underlying dishonesty and deception.

Cybercrime - prosecution guidance | The Crown Prosecution Service

Power to seize and retain evidence. 7.—(1) Where a member of the Garda Síochána who is in—. (a) a public place, or. (b) any other place under a power of​. (6) The collective citation “the Misuse of Drugs Acts to ” shall include Part II (other than section 7) of the Criminal Justice Act 7. Power to seize and retain evidence. 8. Arrestable offences. 9. Amendment of section 4 of Act of Amendment of. 38 of the Criminal Justice Act – Applicant denied that there was any by appellant to the seizure of his telephone – sections 7 of the Criminal Law Act. 7 Power to order preparatory hearing.E+W he may order that such a hearing shall be held. (2)A judge may make an order under subsection (1) above on the.

Phone section 7 of the criminal justice act 2006. Advances in digital programs, technological solutions and enhanced computer graphics have also made it easier to create 'pseudo-photographs' of children.

Information on the time limits for the commencement of criminal proceedings in Section 7 of the Criminal Justice Act (as amended by Section of the Criminal Justice Act ) states that the time contact the Citizens Information Phone Service on 07 (Monday to Friday, 9am to 8pm). The statement added: “The increase in the number of arrests under part 7 of the Criminal Justice Act, represents the continued. (5) After paragraph 40 (offence under section 5 of the Terrorism Act ) insert​— Criminal Justice and Courts Act (c. 2). Part 1 — Criminal Justice. 7. law and are accused of committing offences, in accordance with the values Part 2. Criminal capacity of children under the age of 14 years. 7. The main legislation covering children and the criminal justice system is the The Act was amended by the Criminal Justice Act and the Child Care Act , the age of criminal responsibility was effectively raised from 7 to 12 years. of Practice in accordance with section (5) of the Criminal Justice (Forensic​.

Section 7 reports | New Zealand Ministry of Justice

Criminal Justice Act (sAA(1)), Prevention of Crime Act (s.1A) (section ), Fraud Act , s.1, Fraud Act , s.6, Fraud Act , s.7,​. Hacking is a form of intrusion targeted at computers, including mobile phones and Fraud Act and money laundering offences under Part 7 of POCA should Section 32 of the Criminal Justice and Courts Act makes the offence an.Phone section 7 of the criminal justice act 2006 absence of child Part 5. Bail and custody of children. Bail Act applies. Childrens Court judge to have criminal jurisdiction over child charged Youth Justice Act Page 7. Court may reopen proceedings. Transferee subject to Corrective Services Act from transfer Section 7 of the Charter requires that laws or state actions that interfere The administration of justice includes processes operating in the criminal law (​Gosselin at Rodgers, [] 1 S.C.R. , at paragraph 23; Ruby v. A Q&A guide to financial and business crime law in the UK (England and Wales). The main fraud offences are contained in the Fraud Act (Fraud Act of a commercial organisation failing to prevent bribery (section 7). Common assault and battery - section 39 Criminal Justice Act Section 43 – 48 offences (Armed Forces Act ) JSP MSL Version offence are present e.g. where an accused makes a threatening action but does not Therefore a person in Germany who phones a person in the UK. 7Limits on period of detention without chargeE+W “(b)an offence for which he is under arrest is an arrestable offence; and”.

Phone section 7 of the criminal justice act 2006.

Section 7 reports October 19, – December 19, PART VII COURT PROCEEDINGS. Application of Part. Common Law and Equity (Canada) and a youth justice court for the purposes of the Youth Criminal Justice Act (Canada). (4) The Judicial Council shall provide province-wide free telephone access, including telephone. measures which according to law are incumbent on the investigator. by law. Section 7 – Disqualification of a criminal investigation official letter and telephone as provided in greater detail in the Remand Act (/) and the Act on the Treatment of Persons in the Custody of the Police (/).

7 Days / hours - Maximum Period of Detention. • 6 Hours – Granted by by section 42 of the Criminal Justice Act ) [possession of firearms or ammunition with intent to Telephone Calls and Personal Visits. • Searches. • Provision of. Section 69 of the Criminal Justice and Immigration Act amends section 7 of the Protection of Children Act to extend the definition computer traced images of photographs taken on a mobile phone or images manipulated from Act · Police and Justice Act · Criminal Justice and Immigration Act   Phone section 7 of the criminal justice act 2006 , Human Rights (One Law for All) Amendment Bill [PDF, KB], Sections 19 (colour, race, ethnic or national origin) and Criminal Code Act iii. Part IIAA. Criminal responsibility for Schedule 1 offences and declared offences. Division 1. Preliminary matters. 43AA. Application of. Hitjo013 怪盗 潜入 台湾名門女学院 vol.13 Section 7 of the Electronic Communications Act (a) provides for the use of an and representative's address, including any electronic address and telephone inserted by section 47 of the Police and Justice Act (c. Criminal Law Sexual Offences Amendment Bill It mirrors section 7 of the Act and is required for the same reason for which or who distributes such information about a child whether by internet, phone, text message or otherwise.

Phone section 7 of the criminal justice act 2006

In the Republic of Ireland, section 16 of the Criminal Justice Act is without prejudice to sections 3 to 6 of this Act. Contents. 1 Preamble; 2 Section. Schedule 7 — Road traffic offences: minor and consequential In section 19(11) of the Police and Justice Act (local authority scrutiny of.  Phone section 7 of the criminal justice act 2006 Section 7; the authorisation may be granted only where the officer is satisfied Section 16(1)(b), Criminal Evidence Act Criminal Justice Act , s. Chapter 1 - Scope of application of the criminal law of Finland (/). Section 1 Section 1. [1] In the application of Chapter 1, section 7 of the Criminal Code, the following stances (Treaties of Finland 44/), (/). (5) such main hearing by video conference, telephone or another technical means of com-.

Criminal Justice and Immigration Act | Internet Watch Foundation

Schedule 9 – Single county court in England and Wales Part 3 – Further Act section 7 (2), Administration of Justice Act sections 12 and 13 Commons Act sections 34 (5) and 46 (7) (a), Companies Act   Phone section 7 of the criminal justice act 2006  

Phone section 7 of the criminal justice act 2006. Criminal Justice Act , Section 7

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Phone section 7 of the criminal justice act 2006

If you have a question about this topic you can contact the Citizens Information Phone Service on 07 Monday to Friday, 9am to 8pm. You can also contact your local Citizens Information Centre or Request a call back from an information officer. Indictable offences Section 7 of the Criminal Justice Act as amended by Section of the Criminal Justice Act states that the time limits that are provided for summary offences do not apply to an indictable offence that can be tried summarily an indictable offence is tried by a judge and jury in the Circuit Court or the Central Criminal Court.

Special time limits The general time limit of 6 months for commencing proceedings, mentioned above, applies to most offences which are dealt with in the District Court. Examples of these offences include the following: Under the Regulation of Lobbying Act , proceedings for failure to make a return may be instituted within 12 months from the date of the offence. For offences under the Customs Acts, proceedings may commence within 2 years from the date of the offence. For offences under the Revenue Acts, proceedings may commence within 10 years from the date of the offence.

This does not cover the actual repayment of any unpaid tax, which is a separate matter. Calculating the time Normally, if you receive a summons and you seek legal advice, your solicitor checks the dates on the summons to make sure that the summons was applied for by the Garda within the time limit allowed.

Oberstown is designated as a remand centres for boys and girls under 18 years of age. The Statutory Instrument and Certificate outlining maximum numbers, sex and ages of children that can be detained is viewable here:. Legislation You are here: Home Legislation.

Children Act The main legislation covering children and the criminal justice system is the Children Act Children have equal rights and freedoms before the law equal to those enjoyed by adults and a right to be heard and to participate in any proceedings affecting them.

Detention should be imposed as a last resort and may only be imposed if it is the only suitable way of dealing with the child. Due regard to the interests of the victim. To view the Children Act , please see here. Age of Criminal Responsibility On 16 October , under the Children Act , the age of criminal responsibility was effectively raised from 7 to 12 years.

Interpretation and application of this Part. Behaviour warnings. Civil orders. Appeals against a civil order. Legal aid. Regulations legal aid. Amendment of Children Act Interpretation Part Amendment of section 2 of Act of Amendment of section 3 of Act of Substitution of section 18 of Act of Amendment of section 19 of Act of Amendment of section 23 of Act of Substitution of section 48 of Act of Substitution of section 49 of Act of Amendment of Title to Part 5 of Act of Substitution of section 52 of Act of Amendment of section 53 of Act of Amendment of section 59 of Act of New section 76A in Act of New section 76B in Act of New section 76C in Act of Substitution of section 88 of Act of Amendment of section 96 of Act of Change in title of principal probation and welfare officer.

Amendment of section 91 of Act of Substitution of section 93 of Act of Amendment of section of Act of Substitution of section of Act of New section A in Act of New section B in Act of Minor and consequential amendments of Act of Anti-Social Behaviour by Children. New section C in Act of New section D in Act of New section E in Act of New section F in Act of New section G in Act of New section H in Act of Criminal Law Codification Advisory Committee. Functions of Committee.

Membership of Committee. Conditions of office of members of Committee. Vacancies among members of Committee. Meetings and procedure. Programme of Work of Committee.

Funding of Committee. Report of Committee. Reckless endangerment of children. Restriction of section 10 4 of Petty Sessions Ireland Act Amendment of Courts of Justice Act Amendment of Courts Supplemental Provisions Act Exercise of certain powers by judge of District Court outside district court district. Anonymity of certain witnesses. Information concerning property held in trust. Possession of article intended for use in connection with certain offences.

Possession of monies intended for use in connection with certain offences. Amendment of Offences Against the State Act Amendment of section 5 of Criminal Evidence Act Amendment of section 16B 7 of Proceeds of Crime Act Amendment of section 14 of Criminal Assets Bureau Act Amendment of section 5 of Prevention of Corruption Amendment Act Amendment of section 25 of Petty Sessions Ireland Act Execution of certain warrants.

Imprisonment or distress and sale of goods on conviction on indictment in default of payment of fine. Amendment of section 6 2 a of Criminal Law Act Amendment of section 13 of the Criminal Law Insanity Act Increase of Certain Penalties under Firearms Acts to Increase in Certain Penalties under Explosives Act Offences for the purposes of restriction on movement orders. Minor and Consequential Amendments of Children Act Acts Referred to. Bail Act Child Care Act Children Act Courts Supplemental Provisions Act Courts of Justice Act Criminal Assets Bureau Act Criminal Evidence Act Criminal Justice Act Criminal Justice Drug Trafficking Act Criminal Justice Forensic Evidence Act Criminal Justice Legal Aid Act Criminal Justice Miscellaneous Provisions Act Criminal Justice Public Order Act Criminal Justice Terrorist Offences Act Criminal Law Act Criminal Law Insanity Act Criminal Law Jurisdiction Act Criminal Law Rape Amendment Act Criminal Procedure Act Education Act European Arrest Warrant Act

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Comparison of a disputed writing with any writing proved to the satisfaction of the judge to be genuine shall be permitted to be made by witnesses; and such writings, and the evidence of witnesses respecting the same, may be submitted to the court and jury as evidence of the genuineness or otherwise of the writing in dispute.

The word "counsel" in this Act shall be construed to apply to attorneys in all cases where attorneys are allowed by law or by the practice of any court to appear as advocates. In England and Wales , these must be construed as references to solicitors of the Senior Courts.

In Northern Ireland , these must be construed as references to solicitors of the Court of Judicature. This section provides that the Act does not apply to Scotland. From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. United Kingdom legislation. Parliament of the United Kingdom. Retrieved 21 February Some social networking sites may disable false accounts when they became aware of them.

Developments in technology have also created a new landscape for controlling, sexually-motivated or other forms of interpersonal relationship offending.

Disclosing private sexual images without consent, cyber stalking and harassment, and coercive and controlling behaviour crimes are predominately but not exclusively perpetrated against women and girls, with online activity being used to humiliate, control and threaten as well plan and orchestrate acts of violence.

Such crimes are often part of a wider pattern of behaviour and incidents should be viewed within this wider context which can encapsulate both online and offline activity, including physical abuse.

All VAWG related charging decisions should consider the context of the crime including the potential use of social media to exert power and control. For example, in cases of 'honour' based violence and forced marriage, threats to post personal information on social media can be used to bring shame on victims in order to silence and coerce. Offences under the CMA, such as unauthorised access to computer material with the intent to commit further offences or to impair the operation of a computer, are also often part of a wider pattern of coercive and controlling offending or stalking and harassment.

For example, a stalking victim may have their bank or social media accounts compromised or private intimate photographs copied from their computer hard drive, leading to a range of harm from theft and defamation to a physical attack.

As with online romance fraud, offenders may use online dating sites or social media to facilitate offending under the Sexual Offences Act , by arranging to meet a victim with a view to committing rape or other sexual offences. See the legal guidance on Rape and Sexual Offences for further information. Section 33 of the Criminal Justice and Courts Act created an offence of disclosing private sexual photographs or films without the consent of an individual who appears in them and with intent to cause that individual distress.

The legislation specifies the offence as "photographs or films which show a person engaged in sexual activity or depicted in a sexual way where part or all of their genitals or pubic area is exposed, and where what is shown would not usually be seen in public". The offence is known colloquially as "revenge pornography", which is a broad term that usually refers to the actions of an ex-partner, who uploads a sexually intimate photograph or a video where a person is engaged in a sexual activity on to the internet, or shares by text or email, with the intent of causing the victim humiliation or embarrassment as revenge for the breakup of their relationship.

For further guidance, see the legal guidance on Revenge Pornography. Generally, cyberstalking is described as a threatening behaviour or unwanted advances directed at another, using forms of online communications. Cyberstalking and harassment are often combined with other forms of 'traditional' stalking, such as being followed or, receiving unsolicited phone calls or letters, as well as 'traditional' forms of harassment.

Examples of cyberstalking may include:. In such cases the gathering of data from electronic storage devices and social networking sites will be vital for case building. For further guidance, see the legal guidance on Stalking and Harassment and Social Media. The Serious Crime Act introduced a domestic abuse offence to capture coercive and controlling behaviour in intimate and familial relationships. This offence closed a gap in the law around patterns of coercive and controlling behaviour in an on-going relationship between intimate partners or family members.

The pattern of behaviour and access to resources that the victim has must be considered when contemplating this offence. The use of the internet, social media, spyware and software to track and monitor the whereabouts of a victim and control their contact with others must be taken into account.

The rapid growth of cyberspace has given perpetrators of child sexual abuse, and those who create and disseminate indecent images, a range of new tools to facilitate their offending.

These crimes can be perpetrated through various social media, such as chat rooms, social networking sites, gaming devices that connect to the internet, as well as through direct email addresses or mobile numbers belonging to victims. Cyberspace has the potential to allow offenders to target hundreds of children at a time and once initial contact with a child is made, the children may be subjected to threats and intimidation.

The online abuse can be an end in itself without any contact offences taking place. However, contact offences may occur through arranging to meet up with the child, or persuading them to engage in sexual activity whilst they are filmed or photographed. Further offending may also occur through the dissemination of these films or photographs. Offenders for example may use various control elements as a tool to stop a victim reporting the sexual abuse the control might take the form of threatening to publish photographs or recordings of them, including images of the victim being naked or being abused.

Note that section 69 of the Serious Crime Act created the offence of possessing a paedophile manual or any item that contains advice or guidance about abusing children sexually. This offence captures material giving advice on how to entrap or groom a child, commit other child abuse offences and escape capture. Predatory individuals may access internet sites that children and young people visit in order to search for potential victims by location or interest.

Children and young people may often reveal personal information online, such as where they live or go to school, or their family name, which is used by groomers to manipulate behaviours and build relationships with their victims. Information may be published through a number of different online platforms which are accessible to others, including social networking sites, multi-player gaming portals and other web-based forums.

Section 36 of the Criminal Justice and Courts Act amends section 15 of the Sexual Offences Act the offence of meeting a child following sexual grooming etc.

Following any initial communication or meeting, the defendant must intentionally meet, arrange to meet or travel with the intention of meeting the child, or the child must travel with the intention of meeting the defendant; and the defendant must intend to do something to or in respect of the child during or after any meeting which would, if done in England and Wales, amount to an offence under Part 1 of the Sexual Offences Act Section 36 came into force on 13 April The offence can only be committed as amended i.

For further guidance, see the legal guidance on Child Sexual Abuse. The use of cyberspace and the variety of digital tools available has further facilitated the taking, making, showing and distribution of indecent images of children. Advances in digital programs, technological solutions and enhanced computer graphics have also made it easier to create 'pseudo-photographs' of children. It is an offence for a person to take, make, distribute or advertise indecent images of children.

The main offences for consideration when dealing with this type of offending fall within:. These are either way offences, but offences under the PCA are likely to be the appropriate charges in the majority of cases, as the charge of 'making' under section 1 1 a has been developed to cover activities such as opening attachments to emails and downloading or simply viewing images on the internet as a copy of the image will automatically be created on the device in question's hard drive.

By contrast, the same conduct often cannot lead to a possession charge contrary section of the CJA. The decision of whether to charge 'making' under section 1 1 a of the PCA, or 'possessing' contrary to section of the CJA will often depend how the images came to be located on a device and how accessible they are.

Section 1 of the PCA has a maximum sentence of 10 years' imprisonment. Section of the CJA carries a maximum sentence of 5 years' imprisonment. For further guidance on this and cases involving non-photographic images, such as computer generated images CGI's , cartoons, manga images and drawings, see the legal guidance on Indecent and Prohibited Images of Children.

Whilst the creation of extreme pornography, obscene publications and prohibited images are offences in their own right, cyber-enabled dissemination, usually on a large scale, may also be occurring and should be considered by prosecutors. Dissemination can be via various avenues such as chat rooms, social networking sites, gaming devices that connect to the internet, as well as through a direct email address or mobile number.

When considering what may be classified as extreme pornography, it should be borne in mind that all extreme pornography is obscene as defined by the Obscene Publications Act ; however, not all obscene material is extreme.

The offence of possessing extreme pornographic images, under section 63 of the Criminal Justice and Immigration Act , requires the consent of the DPP to institute proceedings and should be sought at the earliest opportunity.

Consent cannot be implied by the fact that the CPS is conducting proceedings. For further guidance, see the legal guidance on Extreme Pornography. Transmitting comments to another person in the context of an internet relay chat is publication, even if there is just one recipient and one likely reader of the article.

If the publication is obscene, prosecution under the OPA can be considered. For further guidance, prosecutors should refer to the legal guidance Obscene Publications. Computer systems and their components can provide valuable evidence. The hardware and software together with items stored on the computer itself, such as documents, photos, image files, photographs, emails and attachments, databases, financial information, internet browsing history, chat logs, event logs etc.

Games consoles connected to the internet may also provide a source of electronic evidence. Some devices will contain on-board or removable flash storage which allows the user to not only play games, but to also visit websites and store videos, photos, messages etc.

Many mobile phones have multimedia functionality, allowing internet access and access to email, in addition to sending text messages and photographs. Different phones will have varying capabilities and often require specialist equipment to capture the information effectively whilst retaining the integrity of the evidence.

Portable media players such as tablets or music players may also be used to store and play digital media. Investigators have the power to serve orders on CSPs that oblige them to disclose communications data. Verifying the origin and use of some digital evidence can be challenging as it may have been created using complex codes and data, but this should not be seen as a barrier to presenting digital evidence in court.

It is important to stress that digital evidence is no different to other evidence, however it is worth noting that:. When presenting communications data in court, careful consideration must be given to the way in which it will be presented to the jury and make it as simple to understand as possible. A complex cybercrime case is likely to have voluminous electronic data, including communications data and other computer downloads, GPS data, memory or cloud storage, banking evidence and digital tachographs.

The normal rules of disclosure apply to material in electronic form and prosecutors are responsible for serving evidence as is appropriate to prove the case for the prosecution, in accordance with the Criminal Procedure Rules. Bulk electronic material should not be served wholesale without consideration of this overriding principle.

For further information, see guidance on Disclosure - Guidelines on Communications Evidence and Disclosure - A guide to "reasonable lines of enquiry" and communications evidence.

Where jurisdiction is challenged, the courts look at where the site is hosted, its intended audience, the material posted, the nationality of the webmaster and where the information was created and downloaded, applying the 'substantial measure' principle set out in R v Smith Wallace Duncan no. R v Sheppard and Whittle EWCA Crim 65, Sheppard posted racially inflammatory material to a website, registered in his name and operated by him, but based in California.

Once the material reached the server in California, it was posted online and made available on the internet to all those visiting the website, including people in the jurisdiction of England and Wales. The court came to the conclusion that jurisdiction was governed by the substantial measure principle enunciated by the court in R v Smith supra. Everything in the case related to England and Wales except for the server being in California.

MLA is a method of cooperation between states for obtaining assistance in the investigation or prosecution of criminal offences. MLA is generally used for obtaining material that cannot be obtained on a police cooperation basis, particularly enquiries that require coercive means. Requests are made by a formal international Letter of Request LOR , usually on the basis of a bilateral treaty or multilateral convention.

In cases where the requirement of information may be for only traffic or communications data rather than content , then an LOR is unlikely to be required; some information could be sought directly from the CSP. For further guidance, see the legal guidance on International Enquiries.

Note that when the relevant provisions are commenced, the Crime Overseas Production Order Act will provide an alternative approach to obtaining material from CSPs overseas. Complex cybercrime investigations often span several jurisdictions. Investigators and prosecutors need to be able to co-ordinate their approach and respond quickly to developments and opportunities to disrupt or prevent illegal activity, obtain evidence and make arrests.

A JIT is a team set up between two or more countries, under judicial supervision, for the purpose of investigating specific serious cross-border crime and with a limited duration. There are a number of advantages in considering a JIT for a complex case.

For example, it allows JIT members to:. Eurojust can assist when considering the creation of a JIT, or when dealing with jurisdictional and logistical issues where offending occurs in more than one country. It provides a neutral venue for meetings where prosecutors and investigators from two or more Member States can review such cases and agree future actions.

Early consultation with the UK desk at Eurojust when dealing with transnational crime is recommended, particularly if the offending occurs in three or more EU Member States. The GPEN network provides a:. A file that contains other files usually compressed files. It is used to store files that are not used often or files that may be downloaded from a file library by Internet users. Basic input output system. A programme stored on the motherboard that controls interaction between the various components of the computer.

Computers can be unknowingly co-opted to be part of a network used by controller to undertake illegal activity such as being used in a Distributed Denial of Service attack. Such computers are known as botnets. In most computer systems, a byte is a unit of data generally consisting of 8 bits.

A byte can represent a single character, such as a letter, a digit, or a punctuation mark. A place to store something more or less temporarily. Web pages browsed to are stored in a browser's cache directory on a hard disk. When returning to a page recently browsed to, the browser can get it from the cache rather than the original server, saving time and the network the burden of some additional traffic.

Two common types of cache are cache memory and a disk cache. A network of remote servers hosted on the Internet to store, manage, and process data, rather than a local server or a personal computer. Coding is used to write computer programmes or software. Highly-skilled coders are able to write sophisticated programmes using 'scripts' to facilitate unauthorised access to networks or data.

This includes anything comprising speech, music, sounds, visual images or data of any description in relation to a telecommunications operator, telecommunications service or telecommunications system. The 'who', 'when' and 'where' of communication, but not the 'what' i. For example, internet connection records ICR can tell the authorities which websites and applications a user has visited, but not what specific pages on those websites they viewed or what information they exchanged with the app.

Any meaning arising from the fact of the communication or any data relating to the transmission of the communication. Communications Service Provider. A CSP is a company which provides a particular communication service.

Many are based overseas rather than in the UK. This means the term encompasses mobile smartphones, personal tablet devices and games consoles as well traditional 'desk-top' computer or laptops. A computer network is where a number of different computers are connected. These can vary in size from either a small local network - where a number of computers are joined together, such as in a workplace - to the internet which is essentially a connection of billions of computers.

The most powerful chip in the computer. Located inside a computer, it is the "brain" that performs all arithmetic, logic and control functions. Digital material which may be stored on physical devices or in the 'cloud'. Data can include personal or sensitive information which may be exploited by criminals if obtained by them. Structured collection of data that is organised so that it can easily be accessed, managed, and update e.

A subject may delete files in an effort to eliminate evidence but depending on how the files are deleted, in many instances a forensic examiner is able to recover all or part of the original data. An attack to make a machine or network resource unavailable to its intended users, to temporarily or indefinitely interrupt or suspend services offered by a website.

Similar to DoS attacks but effected by using multiple devices often thousands to bombard a website with requests, causing it to cease effective functioning. Any data which is about an entity, an association between a telecommunications serve or an association between any part of a telecommunication system that consists of or includes, data which identifies or describes the entity and is not events data.

Any data which identifies or describes an event by means of a telecommunication system where the event consists of one or more entities engaging in a specific activity at a specific time. Fraudulent financial transactions related to retail sales carried out online. This may include fraudulent card-not-present CNP transactions, which take place over the internet when both cardholder and card are based remotely.

The process of scrambling, or encoding, information in an effort to guarantee that only the intended recipient can read the information. A gigabyte is a measure of memory capacity and is roughly one thousand megabytes or a billion bytes. The Global Prosecutors E-Crime Network is a global community of cybercrime prosecutors and a forum for sharing expertise and experience.

A loosely-defined term which refers to the unauthorised access to a device or computer network. This can either be through the use of illegally-obtained passwords or more sophisticated technical know-how to bypass security systems.

Hacking can be used to gather personal data or information, or disrupt computer networks. Fail to notify change of ownership to DVLA.

Fail to produce insurance certificate. Fail to produce test certificate. Fail to provide specimen for analysis in charge Revised Fail to stop when required by police constable. Fail to use appropriate child car seat. Failure to disclose information about acts of terrorism. Failure to surrender to bail. Falsify or alter records with intent to deceive. Firearms — Carrying in a public place. Firearms — Possession by person prohibited.

Firearms — Possession of prohibited weapon. Firearms — Possession without certificate. Firearms Act , s. Football related offences Revised Criminal Justice and Public Order Act s. Act s. Fraudulent evasion of a prohibition by bringing into or taking out of the UK a controlled drug. Misuse of Drugs Act , s. Funding terrorism.

Terrorism Act , s. Funding terrorism — funding arrangements. Funding terrorism — fundraising. Funding terrorism — money laundering. Funding terrorism — use and possession. Going equipped for theft or burglary. Handling stolen goods. Identity Cards Act , s.

Importing or exporting a psychoactive substance. Inciting a child family member to engage in sexual activity. Inciting a child family member to engage in sexual activity offender under Inciting a child family member to engage in sexual activity offender under 18 ,inciting a minor,inciting sexual activity child family member offender u18,inciting sexual activity offender under 18,sex,sexual offences,Sexual Offences Act s. Indecent photographs of children.

Individuals: Breach of an abatement notice. Individuals: Breach of duty of care. Health and Safety at Work Act section 33 1 a for breaches of sections 2, 3 and 7, Health and Safety at Work Act section 33 1 c , Health and Safety at Work Act sections 36 and 37 1 for breaches of sections 2 and 3 and section 33 1 c. Individuals: Breach of food safety and food hygiene regulations. Individuals: Illegal discharges to air, land and water. Environmental Permitting England and Wales Regulations , regulations 12 and 38 1 , 2 and 3.

Individuals: Restrictions on use of public sewers. Individuals: Transfrontier shipment of waste. Individuals: Transporting controlled waste without registering. Environmental Protection Act , s. Causing a person with a mental disorder to engage in or agree to engage in sexual activity by inducement,causing a person with a mental disorder to engage in sexual activity by deception,causing a person with a mental disorder to engage in sexual activity by inducement,causing a person with a mental disorder to engage in sexual activity by threat,deception to procure sexual activity with a person with a mental disorder,Inducement,inducement to procure sexual activity with a person with a mental disorder,procure sexual activity with a person with a mental disorder,sex,sexual offences,Sexual Offences Act s.

Keeping a brothel used for prostitution. Learner driver or excluded vehicle. Lights defective. Make U turn on motorway. Making Off Without Payment. Making or supplying articles for use in frauds. Meeting a child following sexual grooming. Money laundering. Money laundering: acquisition, use and possession of criminal property. Money laundering: entering into arrangements concerning criminal property. Motoring offences appropriate for imposition of fine or discharge.

No excise licence. No goods vehicle plating certificate. No goods vehicle test certificate. No insurance Revised No operators licence. No test certificate. Non-domestic burglary. Number of passengers or way carried involving danger of injury. Number of passengers or way carried involving danger of injury over 3.

Organisations: Breach of an abatement notice. Organisations: Breach of duty of care. Health and Safety at Work Act section 33 1 a for breaches of sections 2 and 3 , Health and Safety at Work Act section 33 1 c.

Organisations: Breach of food safety and food hygiene regulations. Organisations: Illegal discharges to air, land and water. Organisations: Restrictions on use of public sewers. Organisations: Transfrontier shipment of waste. Organisations: Transporting controlled waste without registering. Environmental Permitting England and Wales Regulations , regulations 12 and 38 1 , 2 and 3 , Environmental Protection Act , s. Owner or person in charge of a dog dangerously out of control in any place in England or Wales whether or not a public place.

Owner or person in charge of a dog dangerously out of control in any place in England or Wales whether or not a public place where a person is injured. Owner or person in charge of a dog dangerously out of control in any place in England or Wales whether or not a public place where an assistance dog is injured or killed.

Owner or person in charge of a dog dangerously out of control in any place in England or Wales whether or not a public place where death is caused.

Paying for the sexual services of a child. Permitting premises to be used. Position or manner in which load secured not involving danger. Position or manner in which load secured not involving danger over 3. Possession for terrorist purposes. Possession of a controlled drug. Possession of a controlled drug with intent to supply it to another. Possession of an offensive weapon in a public place. Possession of an offensive weapon on school premises. Criminal Justice Act , s. Possession of psychoactive substance with intent to supply.

Producing a psychoactive substance. Proscribed organisations — membership. Proscribed organisations — support. Public Order Act , ss. Railway fare evasion Revised Regulation of Railways Act , s. Revenue fraud. Robbery — Sentencing children and young people. School non-attendance Revised Education Act , s. Seat belt offences. Sex with an adult relative: consenting to penetration. Sexual activity in a public lavatory. Sexual activity with a child family member offender under Abuse of position of trust: causing a child to watch a sexual act,Causing or inciting,Causing or inciting a person with a mental disorder impeding choice to engage in sexual activity,causing person,engaging in sexual activity,inciting person,mental disorder impeding choice,mental disorder sexual activity,person with mental disorder,sexual activity mental disorder,sexual activity with a person with a mental disorder impeding choice,sexual offences,Sexual Offences Act s.

Sexual assault. Sexual assault of a child under Sexual offences — Sentencing children and young people. Speed limiter not used or incorrectly calibrated.

Speeding Revised Steering defective.